Weekly pic: August week 3

There was never any doubt: Buddleja salvifolia would be my mid-August subject. As we reach the magic moment when the world starts to waken,  the typical honeyed Buddleja scent wafts on the air; the warmer, the stronger it is. If kept trimmed every alternate year the foliage is lovely and the shrub effective. The flowers can kindly be described as a soft grey with a yellowish eye. A small percentage are whitish or even mauvish or blueish, but don't expect brightly beautiful. Its chief attraction is the deliriously summery smell which hits you unexpectedly, even on cold days like today. It is an endemic pioneer shrub on our mountain and will protect second generation growth like Halaria lucida (tree fuchsia) from the frost.

There was never any doubt: Buddleja salvifolia would be my mid-August subject. As we reach the magic moment when the world starts to waken, the typical honeyed Buddleja scent wafts on the air; the warmer, the stronger it is. If kept trimmed every alternate year the foliage is lovely and the shrub effective. The flowers can kindly be described as a soft grey with a yellowish eye. A small percentage are whitish or even mauvish or blueish, but don't expect brightly beautiful. Its chief attraction is the deliriously summery smell which hits you unexpectedly, even on cold days like today. It is an endemic pioneer shrub on our mountain and will protect second generation growth like Halaria lucida (tree fuchsia) from the frost.

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2 thoughts on “Weekly pic: August week 3

  1. Nice to see my bud Buddleja getting the credit she deserves. Her flowers are under-statedly beautiful, and you’re right her honey scent is lovely. But for me, her best attribute is her soft grey foliage. If I could find an excuse to put her in every garden, I would…

  2. I agree – they flower in the heart of winter in my parents’ Bronkhorstspruit garden when the rest of the burnt Highveld is rather morose. I’m always amazed at the amount of butterflies that appear from out of the wintry drear to visit her. I once asked a nurseryman why wildesalies are not more commonly grown in the north (one sees them in Cape gardens) and he said they are untidy, that’s why. A rather dispiriting reason.

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