A stone cottage in a meadow on a lake

When people ask me where I live I say "In a stone cottage in a meadow on a lake at the bottom of a valley on the top of a mountain." In other words, here. This file pic from April 2006 is a nice contrast to my previous post, showing the view from inside the house. I designed and built the cottage in 1989. Well I din't quite build it - I was the stonemason's assistant. I carried a lot of those rocks myself. And I made some of the furniture and I installed the electricity and it was all very hands-on, although four people warrent a blog on their own...

When people ask me about my home I say "A stone cottage in a meadow on a lake at the bottom of a valley on the top of a mountain." In other words, here. This file pic from April 2006 is a nice contrast to my previous post, showing the view from inside the house. I designed and built the cottage in 1989. Well I didn't quite build it - I was the stonemason's assistant. I carried a lot of those rocks myself. And I made some of the furniture and I installed the electricity and it was all very hands-on, although four people warrent a blog on their own... Fot the first 10 years it was my holiday home. Then it became my full-time home 10 years ago. It is too small. But every alteration I've designed has diminished its perfection, so I live with it - or rather IN it; rather a shambles most of the time, and not helped by the fact that I have four dogs. Five when my folks return to Johannesburg and their dog joins us.

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14 thoughts on “A stone cottage in a meadow on a lake

  1. Nice to meet you, Meredith, and thanks for popping by, Tatyana and Diana! Many years ago a good friend of my parents, an intensely and sincerely religious woman, said earnestly to us whilst looking out over the valley: “You people are truly blessed.” It is 25 years on, but we still often remind one another of her words. Much has happened in the gardens since then, and both houses were built. I like to think that what we have done has improved our blessing further!

  2. Whoa. Those colors look photoshopped, they are so vivid. The cottage is amazing – I wouldn’t change a thing either. I guess if you ever wanted/needed a bigger place you can design and build a bigger one? Perhaps with the dogs in mind…

  3. Hi Tatiana. I’ve learnt to not be afraid to bump up the colour, but I don’t have sophisticated photoshop. Looking at this one, and the strawy straw of the bank, I’s say this is pretty much as it came off the camera. I’ve looked at some of my autumn pics in the grey of August though and thought exactly the same. I am fortunate to have the climate for really spectacular autumn colour – and to have realised 25 years ago that that was the focus of my design. Today when my garden is at its most beautiful, I feel a bit of a charlatan: after all how much cultivation does it take to colour a maple?

  4. Wow! Jack your place looks amazing! That autumn foliage is really something! I miss seeing that here in Durban.

    Looking at your pictures and the plants, I would never have thought this was in South Africa? I’m assuming somewhere in the Cape?

    BTW, do you have any actual redwoods growing in the garden?

  5. What a lovely place to live. I would never have guessed, based on the flora, that was Africa. Funny how we stereotype places in our minds instead of educating ourselves as to how diverse and beautiful they truly are.

    • Thanks for stopping by, Linda. You are right: my place is not in the least typical of Africa. In due course I will post something on areas near me – as little as 10km away – that are archetypal African bush. Our small area’s micro-climate is quite unique, and my garden has exploited the potential of the area.

  6. I fell instantly in love with this beautiful photo! You are truly lucky to be surrounded by this paradise! Yay! for starting your very own blog. Looking forward to learning about your garden, at home and on the job 🙂
    Lynn

    • Hello Lynn, and thanks for stopping by! I think I need to spend a bit of time around your site… I do not do justice to daylilies. Those that have survived for me are the tough-as-nails ones, with the others never clumping up and flowering so seldom as to be all but forgotten. But being pre-spring, it is a good time for new-year’s resolutions about all things herbaceous!

  7. A wonderful start and long over due. I’ve checked the box below to be notified of follow-u[ comments. Hmmm. I was actually hoping to get notified of your future posts. Well, I’ll just have to check in again if I don’t find a way to sign up. Best of luck with all your enterprises!

    -Mark

    • Hi there, Mark and thanks for dropping in! My intention is to update regularly, so you should find something new at least 2-3 times a week. I too need to learn how to be updated on blog posts – the various feeds do that, but I’ve never yet used them. Will let you know once I’ve got it figured! Jack

  8. Pingback: A MONTH FOR MORTALITY | Sequoia Gardens Blog

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