View from the Makou Dam

A late winter view from the dam below my parents' house up the valley towards my dam; the skeleton trees in the distance on the left are the liquodambers on my dam beyond my house. Makou means Muscovy duck; i don't know if there were Muscovies on the dam back in the early 50s when my grandfather bought the farm. One of my earliest memories is the name of the dam, and asking what it meant. The two trees to the right are Swamp Cypresses (Taxodium); beyond the huge shadow of the bluegums - see views across the arboritum in 'A walk in my garden' - are two Pin Oaks (Quercus palustris). on the very right Alfred's Arches can be seen beyond the Upper Rosemary Border. It is difficult in the dead of winter to remember how lush and green the garden was!

A late winter view from the dam below my parents' house up the valley towards my dam; the skeleton trees in the distance on the left are the liquodambers on my dam beyond my house. Makou means Muscovy duck; I don't know if there were Muscovies on the dam back in the early '50s when my grandfather bought the farm. One of my earliest memories is the name of the dam, and asking what it meant. The two trees to the right are Swamp Cypresses (Taxodium); beyond the huge shadow of the bluegums - see views across the arboritum in 'A walk in my garden' - are two Pin Oaks (Quercus palustris). on the very right Alfred's Arches can be seen beyond the Upper Rosemary Border. It is difficult in the dead of winter to remember how lush and green the garden was!

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4 thoughts on “View from the Makou Dam

  1. Jack, This lake scenery here is beautiful. I thought this is the colour of autumn and I tend to imagine that winter is white. I guess it will be very beautiful in spring and summer with a garden by the lake. How big is this lake?

  2. Hello again, Autumnbelle! This is very much late winter – bleached straw and grey dominating. Earlier the gorgeous neutrals are beautiful, especially after the drama of autumn, but gradually everything becomes more bleached by the cold. Once every 25 years it might snow, and if you get to the right place within the hour, you might even see it… Night temperatures drop to below freezing most nights, but day temperatures below 10 degrees are considered seriously cold; 15-18 is the winter midday norm. When there is cloud, nights tend to be warmer and days colder, but as I say: we very seldom see snow!

    Early spring, the most popular tourist season, is bright with azaleas and blossoms, but almost no green. It is in fact my least favourite time, although I too get caught up in the miracle of all the colour. Summer is very green, autumn very rich – orange, yellow, red, cinnamon… We experience the seasons much more intensely here than in most of South Africa, although the generally high altitude of the country, and the dry winters, means that SA has few areas that could be called sub-tropical, despite the latitude.

    This lake and the one in front of my house which is slightly larger, are about 1 1/2 hectares in total.

  3. Even when it is not green, the place still retain its natural beauty. It is nice to be living in such a big place… so spacious with the lake to complete the “feng shui”.
    Cheers,
    ~bangchik

    • Thank you bangchik! I must agree, it is always lovely. It is only now, towards the end of winter, that I get impatient with my garden.

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